New Moon in late Sagittarius: Saturn's Final Words

Welcome to the final lunation of 2017. Every 4 weeks, the Moon and Sun come together in the same area of the sky for a new moon. A new moon is a seed that just might blossom at the full moon two weeks later, depending on its intrinsic qualities, the nurturance or severity of the surrounding environmental conditions, and the fit between the seed and soil. Astrology lends symbols to this pulsing rhythm of conception, growth, birth, life, death, and re-birth, and the truth involves interconnected and overlapping cycles.

Today’s new moon takes place in the very late degrees of Sagittarius, joining retrograde Mercury, Venus, and Saturn. Sagittarius is about the merger of beastly strength and speed with the luminous human intellect. When we set our eyes upon a goal, a dream, or an ideal upon the distant horizon, we must gather up our courage and will and direct all power and attention toward attaining that vision.

thoughts on orgasm in women

Studying orgasm in women is an interesting experience because it evokes both curiosity and discomfort while revealing connections between history, sex/gender relations, politics, science, medicine, spirituality, cultural conditioning, and more. 

gaze at the shadows cast by your proud and waving flag: new moon-solar eclipse in Leo

As creator of ‘nataleo.com’ I’d be remiss not to publish an article about the giant, important, awe-and-fear-inspiring, so-called “Great American Solar Eclipse” that is happening in the late degrees of Leo on Monday, wouldn’t I?

SO MUCH has been written on it, by vague, new-age-y astrologers and excellent, critical, well-researched astrologers and everyone in between. It can be overwhelming to try and contribute something interesting, unique, and fresh.

I don’t wish to repeat what others have said so well, and there are so many layers to this moment in time.

Queen of Heaven Dances Through Her Lover's Castle

Venus is a glimmering diamond in our skies and her beautiful, cyclical dance with the Sun, as seen from our perspective on Earth, inspired ancient people to dub her with such lovely titles as Queen of Heaven. The ancients watched Venus alternate between her visible and invisible phases, when she regally shines in the night sky, she is Hesperos, when she dares to grace the morning skies before the Sun, she is Lucifer (bringer of light), and when her glimmer is absent from our skies, she visits her dark sister, Ereshkigal, in the Underworld.

Unlike the erratic and less predictable cycle of her cosmic lover Mars, Venus’ dance with the Sun creates a 584-day cycle as measured from one conjunction -when Venus is aligned with the Sun - to the next. During her inferior conjunctions, Venus is directly in between the Earth and the Sun and during her superior conjunctions, Venus is directly behind the Sun from Earth’s vantage point. She alternates between being invisible - when she’s in front of (60 days) or behind the Sun (7-8 days) because the Sun’s glare blots out her sparkle - and visibly shining in the night skies (260 days) or morning skies (260 days).